Migraine Therapy and Dr. Sullivan Featured in the Harrisburg Patriot News

Dr. Sullivan and Migraine therapy featured in the Harrisburg Patriot News

We are delighted to share the most recent news story on Dr. Sullivan and Keystone Chiropractic Neurology. The Patriot News has just released a feature article about Dr. Sullivan and new treatment options for migraine suffers. In addition to our ongoing clinical trials for migraine therapy, Dr. Sullivan also offers comprehensive treatment plans with the goal of reducing or eliminating chronic migraine headaches.

Dr. Sullivan's Migraine Therapy Article – Patriot News

Migraines strike Cindy White, 37, of Carlisle, with no warning and escalate quickly. They last anywhere from one day to an extreme of 18 and occur four to six times a month, down from a peak of 15 to 20.

That history made the mom of three an instant fan of a new migraine therapy being tested by Dr. David Sullivan, a chiropractic neurologist in Upper Allen Twp. One session with his new treatment and her full-blown migraine was gone within 12 minutes.

“I was blown away by the procedure. It was unreal,” she said, describing it as noninvasive and painless. “It was kind of relaxing. I was astounded. I called my family doctor, my mom, my husband and said you’re not going to believe this.”

Sullivan of Keystone Chiropractic Neurology said the technique involves pressure stimulation around the ear and does not involve any manipulation to the neck or head. He claims it can “eliminate a migraine in a matter of minutes without injections or drugs.”

Sullivan was guarded in releasing more specific information on the method until results from his pilot study of about 20 people are published in the first quarter of the year.

“I don’t claim that this is the cure,” he added. “This new treatment is just one tool in a vast toolbox that we have to treat headaches … but it seems to be a powerful one among many.”

Chiropractic Neurology and Migraine Headaches

Chiropractic neurologists have advanced post-graduate training as experts of the brain, spine and nervous system. Sullivan said medical neurologists mainly prescribe medications or injections, neurosurgeons use surgery to correct a condition and he practices medication-free and non-surgical methods.

Sullivan, who plans to begin a larger study th

is month, said he “stumbled onto a breakthrough” this summer while working with a migraine patient. She mentioned that her symptoms disappeared when she was near a certain piece of equipment at work. Sullivan tried to re-create that situation to get a similar effect from therapy that “we could see and measure,” he said. “It actually worked.”

“Some of these migraine [patients] come in with a raging migraine and within two to three minutes, it’s all gone,” he said of his therapy. “They’re really astonished. To me, it’s like I can’t wrap my head around it.”

White, a lifelong migraine sufferer, regularly takes a half-dozen medications, not including those she uses when she has a migraine. She hopes to use the therapy as a tool to reduce her need for medications.

“The migraines are pretty bad,” she said. “It stinks. I’ve missed kids’ softball games and activities. It’s hard to miss out on life.”

The therapy made her feel “like a whole new person. I could come home and function again,” she said. “To walk out of there and not be bothered by light and sound and go back to my everyday life with no medicine involved is the greatest thing. And, there are no side effects.”

While Sullivan hopes to have other professionals duplicate his successes in their own trials once he’s published, he is ready for the skeptics.

“I fully expect that there will be a hearty critique,” he said. “All they have to do is experience it for themselves and eliminate a migraine in a matter of minutes. If that doesn’t make them a believer, I don’t know what would.”

Helping to reduce the burden of migraine across the world

Sullivan eventually hopes use of the treatment spreads worldwide and beyond his profession.

“This therapy could be taught to many with little training. Any medical doctor, a physical therapist, a nurse can be trained across the world to perform this therapy and eliminate migraines. It takes no extra equipment, no extra expense,” he noted with excitement. “We are trying to change the world here. I’m in solo practice and can only help as many people as I can see in a day. If we can publish our results, it’s successful and spreads, we can help the whole world.”

Migraine sufferers can learn more about participating in Sullivan’s next study on his website, www.keystonechiropracticneurology.com or by calling 717-697-0589.